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AFK Team Profile

by SmiteGuru on 2015-04-13 04:20:04

In just a few weeks we will have our first SPL Split LAN held by HiRez at their own studio in Alpharetta, GA. Smite fans from around the world will see the top two teams coming out of the NA Spring Split, Team Solo Mid and AFK, as well as the top two teams from Europe, Fnatic, and Trig. For those of you who have been following the competitive scene for a while, you know that these are teams and players who have proven themselves both online, and in the tense, competitive LAN setting. So who will come out on top? Who will make their way to 1st place in the Spring Split and their share of the $60k prize pool, as well as a chance to travel to São Paulo, Brazil and face off against the Latin American teams who are preparing in their own way for the 2015 World Championship? Let’s take a look, as we approach LAN, at the different teams we have coming to HiRez Studios later this month.

AFK Gaming

Formerly Snipe, formerly Complexity, formerly Melior Morior, now AFK, this team has an impressive lineup.These players have been preparing for season 2 before season 2 was even launched. Here are the players from AFK, the team which took down the world champions, Cloud 9, to claim their own spot in the first LAN tournament in season 2 of the SPL.

Kurt “Weak3n" Schray in the jungle.

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You’ve seen his videos, watched his guides, and you’ve seen him playing in the SPL. After replacing the teams former captain and jungler, Shing when he went to Team Dignitas last season, everyone wondered if Weak3n would be up to the challenge that is competitive Smite. He did not disappoint. Coming into season 2 on gods which weren’t seen much to begin with, like Arachne and Thanatos, Weak3n has led his fair share of games, and dominated the enemy’s jungle. Watch for the big ganks, and expect high kill counts from him at LAN.

Jarod "CycloneSpin" Nguyen in the solo lane.

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Coming from season one team Fat Chunks Assemble, he came in and replaced Kiki in the solo lane after his transition into Mid lane. Cyclone, sporting a wider god pool in the warriors and assassins, has gone toe-to-toe with every opponent he has faced this season. Giving the team the extra damage they need when they need it, or the extra frontline when it’s called for, Cyclone has been a great addition to the lineup and is a player to watch in the coming games and future splits.

Ismael "KikiSoCheeky" Torres in the middle lane (name subject to change).

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There have been so many changes to his name since he first came to the scene it can be hard to keep track, but he has always been a formidable opponent to those he lanes against. Topping the healing stats in the solo lane during season one, he has come to face off in what many would consider the opposite of solo lane, mid being a highly active area. He likes to play the rare assassin mid, along with other unconventional picks, if nothing else it will be entertaining to watch, look for an aggressive and unique style coming from Kiki.

Riley "Incon" Unzelman as the support.

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Though we haven't seen it as much this season, everyone knows Incon likes his kills as much as, if not more than, his assists. One of the more aggressive supports coming to the LAN, look for his kill "secures" and the early aggression as he tries to keep the rest of his team safe, while setting up the plays they need to take the major objectives.

David "Allied" Hance in the hunter role.

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You may have seen him at the analyst desk during the 2015 World Championships, and this time he'll be one of the players on the stage. With non-traditional hunter picks, like Freya, it should be more than enjoyable to watch him face off against the other hunters coming to HiRez studios as well. Allied has been on the roster for this team from before the launch team and has worked with his lane partner, Incon, for as longer than some teams have existed. These two will look to dominate out of the duo lane throughout the game.

That wraps it up for the members of AFK, but they will have some tough competition ahead of them. With TSM, who they have faced during the SPL, as well as new competition in Fnatic and Trig, we asked how they felt coming into the tournament. Here's what Incon had to say:

"We are very excited that our hard work payed off for the spring season. We will have very strong competition coming over from Europe with Trig. We will be working extra hard leading up to the LAN and reviewing as many tapes as we can find. We hope to make our fans proud with our performance at this LAN and for the rest of the year."

Good luck to the boys on AFK, and check back in later this week as we take give you a look at Fnatic and their lineup.

This has been Wolfpack89

-VCJ

SPL in Review: Season 2 Spring Split Week 3

by SmiteGuru on 2015-03-26 03:08:39

Wolfpack89 and Jhuns, here, with even more SPL coverage. We’re getting into the home stretch for the Spring Split, so each of these matches could have a huge impact on which teams go to the international LAN tournament. We use Smite.Guru’s Guru Pro Rating (GPR) to score individual players’ performances on a game-by-game basis. Check out our previous article [insert link here] to learn more about GPR.

Wolfpack, why don’t you start us off with the first match of the week over in EU?

London Conspiracy vs. Trig esports

We started out the week in typical EU fashion with a back and forth match which went to game three. London Conspiracy faced off against Trig in this three match set, and it was an amazing start to the week. The first game was pretty much a tie with only 3k gold separating the teams at the 22 minute mark; the game was basically even. Trig came out on top though in the end, only to fall in game two where Suntouch of LC put on an impressive performance as Thor, bringing the control they needed to claw their way back. LC let everyone know that they weren’t going down that easy. We hit game three and Trig came out swinging, with the kill count at 15 minutes being 14-2 in favor of Trig. The first phoenix fell at just 18 minutes, and the Titan fell in a very short 22 minutes.

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The player of this game was Trixtank, the only player to land a score above 1500 average across all three games. Trix was able to step up into the Guardians after being so well known for his warriors playing Bacchus twice as well as Sylvanus in game two. Xaliea was, of course, a force to be reckoned with, particularly in game three as Vamana (the only time Vamana was seen this weekend in EU) landing a GPR in game three of 2179.

London Conspiracy did their fair share of work, with Shaggyshenk and Snakeskin being the lead players, and Suntouch coming to his peak in game two. There wasn’t much coming out from the players of London Conspiracy in game one and three in the face of Trig. They held their opponents off for as long as possible in the first match, took them over in the third, but just could not do anything to stop them in game three. We’ll see in the matches coming up if they can bounce back and put some more wins under their belt.

How was the first match for NA Jhuns?

Denial eSports vs. Enemy Esports

The first match of the week for the NA SPL featured one of its hottest teams versus one of the coldest. Denial looked on-point in their upset victory over TSM last week, and sought to continue that momentum against a struggling Enemy Esports team. With their comfort picks, Denial managed to control NME from early on, finishing both games in a short 27 minutes.

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The star of the game was, once again, the ever-steady Shadowq with a GPR of 2271. His Sylvanus was absolutely impeccable, seeming to get at least three NME gods on each of his ultimate initiations. Coming in at a close second was the solo laner, TheBest, who had a huge showing on Vamana in the second match. Between his game-high 19k player damage, and the absurd 52k damage taken and mitigated, TheBest earned himself a GPR of 1982.

Enemy had a rough couple of games, but Soulshiner still contributed in a big way with a team-high GPR of 1672. While the team didn’t get many kills, when they did Soulshiner was there and involved- especially in the second game on his Arachne. Awesome2daMax had the second-best performance for the NME side with a 1229 GPR. As seems to be the flavor of the split, he pulled out two different assassins in the Solo lane. Although his Bastet had the most deaths for his team, he also put out nearly twice as much damage as anyone else on NME.

How did the weekend start for the EU side of things?

Fnatic vs. Dignitas

The weekend started, and ended, very one sided compared to the match we saw on Thursday. Fnatic came out and absolutely dominated Dignitas in game one and two. There was nothing Dignitas could really do in the face of Fnatic who was constantly taking Jungle, securing objectives, and getting kills. Fnatic is coming out very strong, we just have to see if they have what it takes to go the rest of the way.

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The real star for Fnatic this week is going to be Badgah, in game one with 23 kills in the game, he walked away with 1 kill and 15 assists. Badgah (GPR score of 2135) was involved in almost three out of every four kills in the game, meaning he was everywhere, not just in lane. This let Realzx, who is a force to be reckoned with at any point get the farm he needed, and assisted in helping land maniaKK with the highest GPR for his team, 2454.

Dignitas is hitting some struggles but overall performing well. Game two was by far their stronger game, but Fnatic just could not be stopped. ShadowNightmare performed well, as he always has, dealing out the damage for his team, and landing a GPR of 1585. Everyone has eyes on this team to do well, and there’s no reason they can’t this week, though they were unable to topple what is fast becoming the juggernaut we all call Fnatic.

Jhuns, how was the first matchup for NA this weekend?

Team SoloMid vs. AFK Gaming

Saturday’s matchup had huge implications for the teams at the top of the standings. AFK Gaming (previously Melior Morior) came into week 3 undefeated and on top of the league. Team SoloMid, meanwhile, had just come off a devastating loss to Denial. TSM was able to bounce back though, and take down AFK Gaming two wins to none. While the first game showed several back and forth fights, TSM’s “Protect the Bee” composition eventually took complete control of the map and starved out AFK. The second match was never close, with TSM generating a 5 digit lead before fifteen minutes.

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With a stellar performance on both Ah Muzen Cab and Anhur, Snoopy put up a GPR of 2109 and was this match-up’s MVP. He capped off his great showing by turning a three man gank into a double kill for himself. Divios had the second best rating with a 1992 GPR. Divios seems to be deviating slightly from the rest of his peers, having brought out Guardian gods in both of these matches. Both the Athena and Sobek picks allowed him to control Cyclonespin’s Assassin characters while still bringing decent base damage.

Although it was clearly their worst showing this season, AFK gaming were not without their bright spots. As has been the pattern so far, Incon took top honors for his team with a GPR of 1209. The Support managed to put up more player damage than his Jungler over the course of the two games, a clear sign of the issues that plagued AFK throughout the match-up. Closely behind Incon was the Solo Laner, Cyclonespin with a GPR of 1106. He looked to be the great hope for his team in the first game as a Kali who managed to stay on top of the gold charts for much of the early and mid game. The control on TSM’s side proved too much, however, and Cyclonespin was unable to get his damage on the priority targets consistently.

Back to you Wolfpack. Tell us about the final EU game this week.

Upcoming Stars vs Titan

This one was pretty much a one sided game. Upcoming stars put up a great fight, contesting Titan as often as they could, but it just wasn’t enough in the end. Titan showed their standard teamwork, taking objectives and winning the team fights as a unit. Upcoming Stars did everything they could against the number one EU team coming out of season one, but they could not stop the rampage that Titan was on this weekend.

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Your star, for more reasons than one, in this matchup was Ataraxia, coming away with a GPR of 2036- more than 100 above any other player in the game. He also surprised everyone, especially the viewers, with his new build, which featured the ever popular Fatalis. I know everyone, including myself, is looking forward to seeing the impact this build has on the pro scene, as well as in their own games, but it proved to be more than effective against the Upcoming Stars.

Upcoming stars, of course, had their work cut out for them, but they still came away with a decent score. Particularly Sozage, their solo laner, who had to face off against the fan favorite, Confrey. Pulling of a 1326 he tried to lead his team from Solo island, but one player is never enough. iRens came out swinging in game two, but unfortunately no one else could gain a foothold to overtake their opponents this week.

That wraps things up for EU. JHuns, finish us off for the NA side of things.

Cloud9 G2A vs. COGnitive Gaming

The last set of games for week 3 saw world-champion Cloud9 G2A take on their former sponsor’s new team, COGnitive Gaming. Cloud9 was the clear favorite here, but COGnitive managed to pull out a few surprises, keeping the games close for the first twenty minutes each time. However, just like in their games against AFK Gaming last week, COG would lose a few key fights in the mid-game and let the game spin out of control from there. While the fairly new COG is showing a lot of promise, they are going to need to clean up their team’s synergy after the laning phase if they want to take it to the next level. Cloud9 would go on to take the series 2-0.

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Cloud9 is a team of many threats, and this week’s big performer was 0mega in the Solo Lane with a GPR of 1933. His Hercules was nigh unkillable, only falling on a few occasions, one of which was to stall for his team to get the Fire Giant. In the second game, he once again tore through COG with a Bakasura that put up 23k player damage. Trailing 0mega, but only barely, JeffHindla grabbed a GPR of 1769- primarily off his stellar Geb play in the second game. He was always in the right place to put down a life-saving shield, and his synergy with MLCstealth’s Kraken ultimates was a sight to see.

On the other side of the battleground, the up-and-coming Jungler, Mask, managed to finish with a total GPR of 1639. Perhaps if Mask had gotten a few more kills on to his targets to replenish his health instead of dying at a couple of critical moments, COG could have turned the tide of the second game. Nevertheless, Mask was everywhere on the map, getting involved in nearly every kill his team had. Meerkat had the next best GPR on the COG team with 1290. His Bastet was particularly impressive, putting up 32k player damage, which was 6k ahead of the next nearest, BaRRaCCuDDa.

That’s all the games for this week! We’ll be back next week with more match highlights and player ratings. Remember these are the professional players in a professional setting, please do not try this at home.

SPL in Review: Season 2 Spring Split Week 2

by Wary on 2015-03-16 01:41:09

ShadowV3n0m and Jhuns here to once again review this week’s SPL matches. Let’s look at what teams won and which players had the biggest impact. We use Smite.Guru’s Guru Pro Rating (GPR) to score individual players’ performances on a game-by-game basis. Check out our previous article to learn more about GPR.

Shadow, why don’t you lead us off with some EU action?

Dignitas vs Upcoming Stars

Kick starting the week just a little early on Thursday was Dignitas and Upcoming Stars! Originally, I would have said that it would be close, and perhaps Stars would pull something out of the hat that would sit the DiG boys down, but after last weeks performance I’d then say it would be the other way around.

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Game one kicked off and ended with exactly how Dignitas ended the previous week, winning! YOUNGBAE turned up that game ticking all of our Guru boxes, as he got a Guru Pro Rating (GPR) of 2622! He kind of overdid himself: Xbalanque’s passive only utilizes 6 kills, but Mr. BAE got himself 12 kills to a single death! Variety’s Osiris and FrezzOO’s Athena certainly did well that game, but their efforts and results of gameplay didn’t entirely translate to their score.

Rolling into the second game, it feels like a game of nostalgia from the Dignitas perspective. Ymir & Artemis, Poseidon, Hun Batz and… Thor. Despite Hun Batz and Ymir typically being picks for the Jungle (as this is FrostiaK after all), we actually saw FrostiaK play Thor, who spun, dunked, walled, and spinny hammered his way to victory, and cracked out an 8/1/8 KDA, which resulted in a 1281 Guru Pro Rating. Unfortunately, Stars just weren’t able to keep up with the momentum, Dignitas ran the game at their own pace, and so Stars were left in dismay. Dignitas took their 2:0 win series, and kept their heads high, and are going strong in this Spring Split!

Now Jhuns, would you like to inform us of what happened over the pond?

Melior Morior Vs. COGnitive Gaming

The last time these two teams met back in the first week of the qualifiers, they played under different names. Then Melior Morior (under the Complexity banner) knocked COG (What’s Kraken, at the time) down to the third/fourth place match to advance to the finals. Coming in to this week’s match, there was little to suggest the outcome would be any different with MM’s dominant showing against Denial last week. COG would not be pushed aside so easily, however. They held strong against the relentless attacking style of MM for the first twenty minutes of each game, often grabbing the gold lead even while trailing in kills. Unfortunately, they always lagged behind in experience, which would prove to be their undoing as their teamfight would be dismantled around the 23 minute mark in both games. From there, Melior Morior would latch onto their lead, and systematically destroy every part of COG’s base. MM took home the overall victory, two games to none.

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The standout player of the series was none other than MM’s Weak3n with a GPR of 1953. The Jungler brought out a surprising Thanatos pick in the first match, and got his Solo lane off to a great start with an early kill in lane. While he did get caught out a few times, Weak3n was everywhere in both games, dishing out loads of damage so that the rest of his team could clean up. With Ratings of 1744 and 1720, respectively, Allied and CycloneSpin also showed up with some impressive performances. CycloneSpin had an especially good game on his Bastet, getting 12 kills, 11 assists, and only 2 deaths, while also dishing out 25k player damage and 4k structure damage.

On the other side of the map, Meerkat put in the overall best performance for his team with an average GPR of 1466. His rating comes primarily off the back of his time on Tyr in the second game, where he was involved in all of his team’s kills. He managed to clock in at just over 20k player damage, just shy of Allied’s game-best 22k damage. After Meerkat, Jigz put in two very consistent 1300-range games on Sylvanus for an average GPR of 1341. The COG Support tried his hardest to keep his teammates healthy with almost 9k player healing total.

How were Saturday’s European games, Shadow?

Titan vs London Conspiracy

Moving into the weekend, we see the return of our dear Titan! Yawning from sleeping in all the money they earned recently, Titan was fresh and ready, and took on London Conspiracy head-on. It was certainly expected of Titan to be taking home the win, as they’re regarded as the #1 team in EU, but London Conspiracy is coming into this series with a win under their belts already. Maybe they can roll into some more wins?

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A promising early game comes out from LDNC, but it would seem good old Titan wasn’t that sleepy, as they came out with the overall victory in true clean teamfight style. Confrey picked Chaac that game, and I believe he walked into the lane chanting “Chaac dun care” because he really didn’t. Stacking all the power and penetration he wished, our Guru Pro Rating gave him 1904 for his efforts! There was an interesting Freya + Guan Yu lane coming out from Ataraxia and KanyeLife too, which worked better than first impressions anticipated.

Charging into game two we saw some more cavalry coming out from KanyeLife, who really brought out the big Guan plays this game. Titan had an even cleaner teamfight sequence, dropping only 4 lives between all of Titan that game. KanyeLife earnt himself a Guru Pro Rating of 2179. Heck, he even competed with Confrey’s Aphrodite for healing. He was working that much! Titan takes it with a 2:0 series win, which is the start they were looking for. Will we ever see a third game come out in Europe!?

And again, back to you, Jhuns, for our NA Saturday night show!

Cloud9 G2A vs Enemy Esports

Enemy Esports came into this match as the clear underdogs, but weren’t about to be intimidated. The previous world champions looked uncharacteristically sluggish in the first game, which allowed Enemy to build up a kill and gold lead. It looked like Enemy was only some routine play away from the big upset, but C9 was able to drag the game out to the late game, where they won a teamfight to secure the Fire Giant and eventually the game. The second game was also close for the starting minutes, but eventually C9 shook off their rust and started to dominate Enemy. Cloud9 took the set two games to none.

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Omega shined in this match-up, putting up dominant numbers with both his Chaac and Bakasura, and earning himself a GPR of 2007. He soaked up tons of damage and dished it back as Chaac, and almost singlehandedly kept his team in the game on a few occassions. With a rating of 1658, the ever consistent BaRRaCCuDDa finished with the second best performance on his team. Andinster also looked good on his Serqet, getting a GPR of 1610 overall and a 2049 in a dominant second game.

For Enemy, the clear MVP was BronxBombers, who clocked in an overall GPR of 1485. BronxBombers absolutely shone in the first game on Ullr, dealing 52k player damage and getting 16 kills, while only dying 4 times himself. After the ADC, Enemy’s substitute Support, MrMakey, had the second-best showing with a GPR of 1349. His Athena was particularly good, with on-point taunts and body-blocks to help BronxBombers pick up his many kills.

Cloud9 G2A vs Team SoloMid

There were a lot of high expectations going into perhaps the most anticipated NA match this week, and it delivered. This was a closely-contested series, but in the end TSM stood victorious. The first game looked like C9 had it in the bag, but a huge fight at TSM’s Solo Phoenix turned the favor to TSM, who would go on to kill the Titan. The second game started similarly, but this time Cloud9 closed up the holes in their play to force a third game. However, after a relatively close start TSM took over and exhibited their typical total-map dominance in the final game. TSM takes the series 2-1.

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Top notches go to Divios for his Solo play with a total GPR of 1833. His Hades in the first game was critical for the comeback. While his Tyr was less inspiring, the young player pulled out all the stops on Osiris in the third match as a huge disrupter in the fights. Following close on his tail was Eonic with a rating of 1811. The TSM Support had quite a few clutch saves with his Geb shield.

Cloud9’s top player was once again Omega ending the series with a score of 1877. Of particular note was his Bakasura in the second match, which he used to completely shut down his opposite, Divios. And second on the charts was BaRRaCCuDDa, raking in a total of 1768. BaRRa only looked somewhat weak in his final match, where the team lost before his Xbalanque could really come online.

Let’s move into the final day of this week’s competition. Shadow, tell us about the Fnatic doubleheader on Sunday.

Fnatic vs TRIG esports

It’s the beginning of the end! We start the final day of Week 2 with Fnatic (which was SK Gaming) against trig esports. Whilst trig esports may be listed as a team that are qualified, they actually hold seasoned players as old as those over on the Fnatic roster, meaning intense games were expected.

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The first game was very much a game of chess: everybody thinking several moves ahead, and waiting for a mistake to then capitalise on. It took 20 minutes for the first blood to come out (on the side of Fnatic actually), but unfortunately the late game comp came out to work fantastically for Trig, bringing home the bacon that first game. Xaliea with the good old Vamana brought out a GPR of 2054, with the backup performance coming from Funballer who scored 1963 even though he had a 1/2/9 KDA (as opposed to Xaliea’s 7/1/5 KDA).

Going into the second game Trig looked really secure and ended up taking the second win that way as well. There was confusion of the team composition on Trig’s side of things before we actually saw who was playing which god, but we saw a Hercules, a Ymir, and a Nemesis picked up. That turned out to be Trixtank’s Hercules (who was insaaaane scoring 2434 in our GPR), QvoFred’s one-of-a-kind Ymir build (Reinforced Greaves into Breastplate of Valor, then Winged Blade into Void Stone) and finally Xaliea’s Nemesis. Interesting picks for the Jungle and Solo, but again they worked well in their roles. Xaliea rolled a 2066 GPR, and QvoFred froze at 1769.

Fnatic vs Titan

With the last series not going too well, it honestly didn’t look too promising for Fnatic’s next matchup, Titan. With Titan already putting in a performance earlier this week, both teams had now played a series to warm up as such, as it’s back to big boy games!

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Game one showed us that Realzx didn’t really fall off or go anywhere, he was just preparing himself for the entirety of Titan! He gained a Guru Pro Rating of 2593 in that game, showing that Fnatic are actually a top team and should not be doubted, even with a sponsor change and role swap. Zyrhoes brought out his Vulcan, and to quote F., “Zyrhoes wanted to play vulcan so badly he switched roles to mid.” Along with everybody else, Zyrhoes made sure Realzx carried on the Xbalanque pick, who finished at 7/1/8 in KDA.

Rolling into the second game, we saw Fnatic draft.. almost exactly the same group of gods? It most definitely worked though, as Fnatic were yet again effective and put Titan down. Titan’s reign of #1 EU team may not last all that long! Claiming 17 lives, and only losing 5 throughout the game, Fnatic brought their A-game. Realzx on Xbalanque again goes 8/2/4 in KDA, and a 2089 GPR, but CaptainTwig waves hello on the Arachne with a 2100 GPR, and a 2/2/14 KDA doesn’t tell the whole story, eh? We saw interesting build choices coming out from the Fnatic side, but with results like that you daredn’t question it!

Hit me with your final series, Jhuns.

Team SoloMid vs Denial eSports

After getting smashed by Melior Morior in their first outing, Denial looked to bounce back against one of the strongest teams in the league. And bounce back they did. Although they faltered late in the second game, Denial largely controlled the map against a TSM that looked out of sync and out of sorts. The third game sent a particularly chilling message, with Denial taking a Phoenix in under fifteen minutes. Denial takes the series 2-1.

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The top performer of the series goes to Shadowq, with a series-high rating of 1601. He played a brilliant Sylvanus in both of their wins, but he looked most impressive in his final outing where he scored a nearly perfect 2832. His pulls and ultimates were accurate and well-timed, which set his team up perfectly to snowball into the midgame. Close on the Support’s tail was his lane partner, madmanmarc22. The ADC ended the series with a GPR of 1592, riding mostly on his Ullr performance. In that final, utter stomp of a game, madmanmarc22 managed to deal nearly 8k structure damage in just 20 minutes.

No one on Team SoloMid had a great day. Only DaGarz in the jungle showed his usual prowess with a GPR of 1538. He basically carried the second match on his own back as Hun Batz to keep TSM’s hope for a series alive. Other than DaGarz, Divios was the only other player to score above 1000, with a GPR of 1204. Although he got off to a rough start, Divios managed to make his Hades a force to be reckoned with in the second game. The first game Odin pick was puzzling and did not work out at all, earning Divios the lowest single-game GPR in the series of 535 points.

And that’s it from us. We’ll be back next week with more match highlights and player ratings. Remember these are the professional players in a professional setting, please do not try this at home.

Interview with NME Tocketty

by SmiteGuru on 2015-03-15 06:45:14

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With the new Smite season starting this past week, we have seen some unexpected teams come from the qualifiers. One of those teams was Busters, which was recently sponsored by Enemy eSports. I got a chance to sit down with Tocketty, the team captain and mid laner, and ask him a few questions. Here’s what he had to say.

Questions

Lemons - As you are new to the scene to a lot of people, why don’t you say a little bit about yourself?

Tocketty - I have flirted with the competitive scene in Smite for some time now. I went to PAX Prime 2013 under the organization Reason Gaming, which consisted of Wolfy2032, HirezPeccyz, HirezAdanas, and Snoopy. I also went to RTX 2014 under Critasuarus, coming in second against Dignitas. I quit the scene but came back as a coach for the challenger team, Rambozos, who were invited to the North American Regionals. Other than that, I'm a big troll.

L - How did you get into Smite?

T - After sucking really badly at League of Legends, my friends introduced me to Smite. When we got to level 30, I solo queued into Jerbie and Shing's games all the time. Shing and I duo queued a lot, and because of that I was already interacting with the top players.

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L - Who is your favorite god and why?

T - My favorite god used to be Isis, but now I'm leaning towards Hebo because everyone is playing and banning Isis in scrims. I really like the feel of both characters. You can play either really aggressive or fairly passive, and still do really well. Both characters can also make big plays depending on how you play them.

L - You were the coach for the team that got first in the challengers last year. Was it hard for you to make the transition from coach to being the mid laner for enemy?

T - I wouldn't say it was hard to transition, but it certainly helped me as a player. Being a coach and having people trust your judgement made me a more confident and mature person. I used to never talk in important games, but now my team depends on me as the captain and the shotcaller of the team.

L - Coming into the qualifiers you and your team were looked at as the underdogs. But as the weeks progressed you beat out teams like Eager and Nomad. What did you guys do to prepare for the qualifiers?

T - I talked about it in my vlog (found here). We had two weeks of unfortunate seedings, but we still learned a ton from the games. The weekdays leading up to Week 3, we also focused on making teams fear our Isis, which forced Nomad and Eager to draft around that in our games.

L - You guys recently got sponsored by Enemy eSports. Can you tell us a little bit about that?

T - When we got the official invite into the SPL, I reached out to a friend who had contacts with Enemy Esports. We spent the entire week getting to know them, and we really liked their approach to the scene. Overall, I think Enemy Esports is a great home for the team, and I'm looking forward to working with them as we grow.

L - What do you do when you’re not playing Smite?

T - When I'm not playing Smite, I like to play H1Z1 or CS:GO with the Trig Esports guys. Aside from that, I still have school, so I focus on that too.

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L - Do you have any tips for players out there that are aspiring to one day play professionally in the future?

T - Definitely grind out ranked and watch pro player streams. Also, if they’re not streaming you can still go into their match history and watch their games.

L - Are there any teams you are looking forward to playing in the upcoming weeks?

T - I'm looking forward to playing Denial. I think both teams will benefit from the win, and I really want to show that we can still hang with the top tier teams regardless of our results against COG.

L - What team do you think will be your biggest challenge?

T - Definitely Cloud 9, just because they are proven to be the best and have been the best in the world for quite a while now.

L - Where can everyone follow you?

T - You can find my youtube channel, where I have a few vlogs and other smite related videos here. My twitter is @NME_Tocketty and I, with the team, will be moving over to Azubu to stream there shortly.

L - Do you want to give any shout outs to anyone out there?

T - I want to give a shout out to Enemy eSports for all the support they’ve given so far.

L - Good luck with your game against Cloud 9 this Saturday. I hope we get to see some great things out of you and your team in the upcoming weeks.

T - As do I! Thanks for having me.

I’d just like to give a thank you to Tocketty for sitting down and talking to me. You can follow him and his team at the locations listed below. Let us know on twitter who you want to see for the next interview. Until then, when life gives you me, you make LemonsPeppers.

Tocketty
Twitter
Youtube

Enemy Esports
Twitter
Facebook

SPL in Review: Season 2 Spring Split Week 1

by Ninmengi on 2015-03-11 02:37:54

Hello Guru followers! Here Jhuns and ShadowV3n0m go over the first set of matchups in this Spring Split with some Guru Pro Ratings (GPR) to follow!

Before we get into the matches, we should probably explain what the Guru Pro Rating is, and what it means. Essentially, a GPR rates a player’s in-game performance against a typical performance for a player in the same role. Ratings range from 0 to 3000, where a perfectly average performance would earn a GPR of 1500 and the best showings are awarded a 3000. We don’t want to go into the details, but players are evaluated in five categories: Tankiness, Player Damage, Structure Damage, Gold Earning, and Kill Participation. Each category is weighted differently depending on the position of the player being evaluated (i.e.Tankiness is more important to Supports than to ADCs, while the opposite is true for Structure Damage). Finally, we add up all the category scores to get the full Guru Pro Rating.

ShadowV3n0m, why don’t you start us off with one of our premier European matches?

Team Dignitas Vs TRIG esports

Well in the first game between Dignitas and Trig we saw what looked like a dominant and first (hopefully second) performance coming out from Trig. We expected them to resemble part of the old TSM in the fact that they’d be consistent in their plays, with a bit of flavour from the likes of Funballer and Xaliea. And that’s exactly what we saw in the first game, Freya ADC for Funballer and TrixTank in his warrior role rocking the Hercules. Against the more ordinary Athena and Cupid, the duo from Dig couldn’t stand up to Trig’s, which we see in the overall numbers.

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FrezzOO and YOUNGBAE were seen to end with a GPR of 1148 and 913 respectively, against their direct enemies in Trig, Trixtank and Funballer, scoring 1747 and 1164 themselves. Although, going into game two we saw the magic happen. What was once a favored Trig match became a possible upset, as Dig took the second match. FrostiaK settled back into the jungle carry he really is (unfortunately having an unfavorable first game, going 2/6 with Mercury) pulling out Hun Batz, and topping the Guru Rating this game at 2167 and 9/6 in K/D!

Leading into the third game, Dig had the win in their grasp. Whilst unfavored, it seemed as if Dig was going to unexpectedly take it all, and they did. Variety really turned up in the final game, coming out with Osiris of all the gods. We know he loves his ranged, usually mages, but the adaptation to the physical melee is really coming through. FrezzOO also showed Trixtank who’s boss throughout the game and with the final GPR. Frez, with 2209, overlooks Trix at 1162. Better luck next time.

Hopefully we see Dig prove that they should be the top team in this Spring Split again, but I also hope that Trig will show their true potential that much of the community sees.

Alrighty, now how about one those NA team-name-changing games, Jhuns?

Denial eSports Vs Melior Morior

These teams have faced each other three times in the past four weeks. Although each of the matchups showed different team names on the scoreboard, the outcome has not varied. For the third time in a row, Melior Morior has defeated Denial two wins to none. Melior Morior put on a dominating performance, knocking down their opponent’s Titan in under 25 minutes each game.

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Everyone on Melior Morior put in some of their best performances to date, but it was their Support, Incon, who put on a particularly impressive show. He was constantly in the fight, absorbing and healing back damage for his team, without actually taking the plunge. Over the two games, Incon averaged a GPR of 2711, nearly 500 more than the next closest, which was his ally CylconeSpin in the Solo lane with 2216.

On the other side of the ball, the most impressive player was also the Support. Shadowq played his Athena well despite the losing circumstances, and earned himself a rating of 1389. Only Macetodaface was also able to break a 1000 rating for Denial.

This weekend Melior Morior will look to continue their winning ways against fellow qualifying team, COGnitive. Denial will attempt to get their first win against last season’s regional champion, Team SoloMid.

Back to you on our EU extraordinaires, ShadowV3n0m.

London Conspiracy vs Upcoming Stars

So for this series, it was almost a coin flip (at least for me) for who would win. I could see the experience from London Conspiracy - the roster playing against Upcoming Stars have all had previous competitive experience. But then I saw the freshness from Upcoming Stars, perhaps they could bring something new to the table (I mean look at Titan’s story or even older happenings of SMITE).

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The first game was a show of the experience coming out from LDNC- Suntouch with a very heavy push, and Bastet for kills and presence, using cats to force the Stars away from where LDNC wanted to be pushing. Shouts to the big tree (Syvlanus) played by EmilZy, a few cheers were given at the pulls being made! It was a fairly quick game though, as the Titan fell down pre-20 minutes, which was an unfortunate outcome for Stars’ first game in the Spring Split. EmilZy received a Guru Rating of 2025, which was the highest on the LDNC side. Unfortunately, we didn’t see much out out of either team’s Hunters (Cupid for Shaggyshenk and iRens on Artemis). Their kill participation was minimal, but that was likely due to the time the game ended, as ending just before 20 minutes meant the Hunter’s peak was almost there, but not quite.

Rolling into game two, it was an unfortunate dominant performance (from the perspective of Upcoming Stars at least) coming out from London Conspiracy, forcing out a 16 minute surrender. With a disconnect coming out from Cherryo during the match, this left Stars in an even more difficult position than they’d like to have been in. This eventually led to their demise, with LDNC actually being held back better this game until that point. Suntouch took the reign with the GPR, 1886 leading the team to the overall victory in the series. Notable mention to Snakeskin, a seemingly quiet solo laner who does well in his farm, push, and teamfights, who scored decently when looked at with our Guru microscopes!

Perhaps the next time these teams meet, Upcoming Stars will have some real stars shining, or is this all a Conspiracy for London to win?

Round it up with our final series of the week Jhuns!

Enemy Esports Vs COGnitive Gaming

Both Enemy and COGnitive have something to prove this season. Enemy will want to show that their upset of Nomad and Eager in the qualifying group rounds was more than just a good day, while COGnitive’s name alone bespeaks greatness. This time, it was COGnitive who came out on top, forcing early surrenders from Enemy in both games. Enemy was able to keep it close for the initial fifteen minutes or so of the first match, but after that it was the COG show. There would be one more glimpse of hope for Enemy, when, in the second game, COGnitive made an early attempt at the Fire Giant. After tanking the Fire Giant’s damage poorly, Enemy was able to sweep in and get a 3 for 1 trade. But it was not enough, and five minutes later the surrender vote came.

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With a GPR of 1987 COG’s Jungler, Mask, took home honors for best performance over the two games. The man was everywhere, and involved in almost every kill for his team, especially in the first game as Arachne. Coming in a close second was Meerkat at 1746. Much like CycloneSpin before him, Meerkat showed a preference for Assassins by picking up Hun Batz and Arachne.

Unfortunately, Enemy did not have a strong showing. Their overall highest rated player was Awesome2daMax, who clocked in at 1254. BronxBombers deserves a shoutout with his overall average of 1088 points, the second best effort on his team. BronxBombers’ Cupid in the first game showed great promise as he outboxed his opposite, FaymousHate, for several solo kills. He single-handedly kept the Enemy squad in that match for a while.

COGnitive will now have to face the impressive-looking Melior Morior squad on Thursday. This will be a tough matchup for the newer team, but it should be interesting to see how the up-and-coming Mask will fare against MM’s more established Jungler, Weak3n. Enemy’s schedule only gets more difficult from here, with a match against the season one world champions, Cloud9. This will be Cloud9’s first competitive match since the Smite World Championship, so perhaps Enemy can hope to find the champions a bit rusty.

And that’s it from us. We’ll be back next week with more match highlights and player ratings. Remember these are the professional players in a professional setting, please do not try this at home.

Smite World Championship: Day 3

by Ninmengi on 2015-01-11 17:19:44

Live Updates from the SWC!
We are in Atlanta covering the SWC! We will be updating this article throughout the day with the latest information and reactions with players and community members. Make sure to check back frequently and follow us on Twitter and Youtube for the latest!

Watch the event live from home:
You can catch the event live on the official stream at http://twitch.tv/SmiteGame

Watch the event on your phone:
Our friends at ZAM have created Observer for Smite a mobile app just for the SWC! Check it out for complete coverage on the go. It includes a schedule of events and even gives you push notifications when the games start! You can find it on the Apple App Store and on the Google store as well. The links are below make sure to check it out:
Google: Download Here!
Apple: Download Here!

Consolation Match: SK vs COGR [COGR wins 2-0]



Quick and Dirty:
SK’s drafting issues once again seemed to hamstring the team. COGR showed why they were the most dominant NA team this SPL, latching onto leads and farming the map at peak efficiency in both games. SK showed a little life for about the first 15 minutes of the first game, but after that their play was simply uninspired.

Player:
This series was the Divios Show. Divios faced down one of Europe’s top solo and jousters in Maniakk and showed no fear, managing to get solo kills in both games. On his now signature Hercules, Divios made his presence known all over the map once he got ahead. In the second game especially, Divios’ lead forced Maniakk into a defensive build, which allowed COGR to essentially ignore the Chaac during later teamfights.

Big Play:
Twelve and a half minutes into the second match Divios was zoning out SK from the rest of COGR who were attacking the Gold Fury. Suddenly he unleashed a Driving Strike and hit Maniakk, Zyrhoes, and CaptainTwig. He followed up with an immediate boulder, which managed to finish off Aphrodite. The rest of COGR piled in and finished off the other two SK members.

Was Over When:
In the second match four of COGR members were posturing for Fire Giant while Snoopy was pushing down the towers in the duo lane. Realzx could do nothing but stand outside of Snoopy’s range and watch his towers fall.

What’s Next:
COGR goes home with a third place finish, taking $390 thousand with them. SK takes 4th overall and $261 thousand.

Championship Match: COGP vs Titan [COGP wins 3-2]






Quick and Dirty:

COGP came out looking exceptionally dominant in the first two games, crushing Titan with their signature safe and map-control playstyle. However, Titan is the king of comebacks and managed to fix their pick/ban stage in order to get Ares onto Kanyelife. This allowed them to pull out close victories in games 3 and 4, sending the series into a decisive fifth game. This time it was COGP that reworked their own bans, managing to get the elusive Ao Kuang and Jeff”TheSex”Hindla’s stellar Sylvanus. Titan managed to take some early fights and build a small lead, but then Andinster’s Ao Kuang came online. Falling back into their old ways, COGP swept the map of all its objectives and took the series.

Player:
Although MLCSt3alth had probably the overall best performance for the entire tournament, this particular series was won and lost on the back of Andinster in the Jungle. It was his Thor ganks in the first two games that set up COGP for victory and it was his mastery of Ao Kuang that allowed his team to overcome Titan in game five.

Big Play:
As seems to be tradition for me, the big play actually came from the losing team. Seeing an opportunity to extend his team’s lead in game three, Kanyelife blinked in with Ares and ulted on four members of COGP near the Chaos side of the Gold Fury. This resulted in the death of three of COGP, including BaRRaCCuDDa. Titan turned for the Gold Fury, then cleaned up MLCSt3alth’s Scylla when he tried to defend. This was what finally gave Titan a significant lead and would propel them to win the next two games.

Was Over When:
Fighting for their tournamen lives, Titan moved three to contest COGP’s Fire Giant. They arrived too late and a three man Driving Strike from Omegatron set up MLCSt3alth’s Scylla ult. Resulted in a Deicide and COGP marched down the midlane unopposd for the win.

What’s Next:
Titan goes home defeated but still loved, taking a rough second place and about $500,000. The home-town favorite, COGP takes home the championship and over $1.3 million in prize money.

Smite World Championship: Day 2

by Ninmengi on 2015-01-10 17:15:21

Live Updates from the SWC!
We are in Atlanta covering the SWC! We will be updating this article throughout the day with the latest information and reactions with players and community members. Make sure to check back frequently and follow us on Twitter and Youtube for the latest!

Watch the event live from home:
You can catch the event live on the official stream at http://twitch.tv/SmiteGame

Watch the event on your phone:
Our friends at ZAM have created Observer for Smite a mobile app just for the SWC! Check it out for complete coverage on the go. It includes a schedule of events and even gives you push notifications when the games start! You can find it on the Apple App Store and on the Google store as well. The links are below make sure to check it out:
Google: Download Here!
Apple: Download Here!

Titan vs WL8 [Titan Wins 2-0]




Quick and Dirty:

The first game was an exciting back and forth affair with a ton of skirmishes. Titan slowly built up a lead and eventually were able to take out the Fire Giant and then march to the Titan. In their second outing WL8 doubled down and picked an Odin Zeus duo lane. However, right off the bat Kanyelife caught an out of position Qe3q. It was a steam roll from there, the Odin Zeus wombo combo never quite working.

Player:
I’m going on a limb here and giving it to KanyeLife for his absolutely spot-on Ares and Ymir play. His Ares’ Chains almost never missed, setting up several kills in the duo and mid lane. And it was his Ymir blink freezes that made it possible for his team to crush in the second match.

Big Play:
In the first game Repikas would attempt his second gank on the solo lane at 15 minutes. OReiTroll falls, but manages to put down the cripple from his ultimate before he dies. This causes Repikas to miss his Thor teleport. Suzuki and Nann swoop in and clean up both Repikas and Confrey.

Was Over When:
The second game was never close, but at 11 minutes Suzuki and Qe3q tried to pull their ultimate combo on Repikas and Kanyelife. Ao Kuang blinked out and Ymri just absorbed all the damage. The following teamfight was a wipe in favor of Titan, who then secured the Gold Fury and never looked back.

What’s Next:
WL8 goes home with a 5/6th place standing. Titan advances to face their European kin, SK in the Semifinals. Titan beat SK in their last meeting 2-0 at the EU Regionals.

COGR vs OMG [COGR wins 2-0]



Quick and Dirty
A dominant performance from COGR in both games, giving up under 15 deaths combined. OMG looked simply outmatched. COGR picked up the Fire Giant in under 17 minutes in each game.

Player:
There’s a reason DaGarz is also known as ThorGarz. OMG allowed him to pick his signature god in both games, and he capitalized with a vengeance. In the first match, DaGarz went 10/1/15, involved in all but 3 of COGR’s kills. His only death occurred during the final push under the Titan.

Big Play:
At the very beginning of the first game, OMG showed they weren’t afraid by invading and taking both of COGR’s blue buffs. However, COGR was unphased. DaGarz went straight to midlane and helped TheBoosh get first blood on an out of position NeverAns. He proceeded to head to the duo lane where he helped Snoopy and Eonic clean up the duo lane. Eonic pulled off one of the most beautiful pulls with Sylvanus to ensure the final kill. Riding the momentum, DaGarz revisited midlane and got another kill on Hel. To wrap it up he ulted into the solo lane and picked up a kill on Enjing’s Chaac. This all happened before 2 minutes into the match.

Was Over When:
Neither match was ever very close, but everything was clearly over when OMG sent FightingJ, Enjing, and Nifeng to kill off a half-health Divios. Even after using all three of their ultimates, Divios’ Hercules escaped, almost with more health than he started.

What’s Next:
OMG will have to head back to China with a 5th/6th finish. COGR advances to face their sister team COGP. COGP was one of only two teams able to take matches from COGR during the entire season of NA SPL. The winner will advance to the Grand Finals.

Titan vs SK [Titan wins 2-0]





Quick and Dirty:

What a series! The first game started very slow, with no first blood until 16 minutes in. Zyrhoes continually pressured solo lane, but Repikas was there almost every time to bail out Confrey. Titan were able to consistently find Zyrhoes’ Kali, hamstringing SK’s ability to teamfight. Still, CaptainTwig’s Agni stuns and Realzx’ Rama were on point for defense, trying to delay for Kali’s late game. It wasn’t enough. The second match was a simlar story, although this time it was a lot of pressure from Repikas on Thor. Pretty Prime showed he knew how to duel with the first Nox of the tourney.

Player:
Repikas once again carries his team to victory. He showed great god pool dviersity, bringing out the jungle Athena and Thor to shut down Zyrhoes’ Kali, who hadn’t died in the tournament up to that point. His pressure on the map was everywhere, even while he bailed out Confrey consistently in the solo lane.

Big Play:
Although they didn’t win, the biggest play this series was by SK in the first game. Shortly after getting the first Fire Giant, Titan tried to pressure SK’s left phoenix. SK made a valiant defense, while they lost 4, they took out three of Titan’s players and kept their phoenix standing.

Was Over When:
The whole series was very close. The match was probably over at 27 minutes in the second match when Titan was able to take out Badgah and Realzx in the right lane, then secure their second Fire Giant.

What’s Next:
SK falls to the consolation match. Titan advances to face the winner of the COGP and COGR games.

COGP vs COGR





Quick and Dirty:

In what was the most back and forth series of the tournament so far, COGP manages to outlast COGR and come back from a first game deficit. The first game was extremely close, with lots of fights all over the map. Finally, COGR managed to deicide COGP and rush for the Titan win. The second game was more in Prime's control, but a clutch base defense extended the game to be the longest one we've seen so far here. The final match started once again with a first blood for COGR, but Andinster took over the game as Serqet. DaGarz had what might have been the worst performance he's ever had on Thor.

Player:
This series was full of amazing plays and players, but MLCSt3alth takes the cake. Although his play in the first game was less than stellar, he turned it around with Nox in game 2 and dominated Boosh in lane. Then he had a second chance with Scyla in the third game and smashed it. He hit nearly every ultimate, and managed to stay alive for the entire match.

Big Play:
Despite COGR winning, once again the play of the series came from a losing team on a base defense. With a phoenix down and all four of his teammates dead, Eonic had little hope of extending the game for his team. However, he dashed in as Athena as COGP attacked the Titan, taunted, and began to body block with precision. His teammates respawned just in time to clean up three kills and take the Fire Giant, nearly turning the whole game around.

Was Over When:
Toward the end of the third match with a lead, COGP started the Fire Giant. The attempt went completely uncontested by COGR, the team clearly out of sorts. After this, the result was elementary.

What's Next:
COGP advances to a rematch with Titan in the Grand Finals for a chance to win the $1.3 million prize pool. COGR falls to the consolation match where they will have to once again face off against SK for a chance at third place.

Smite World Championship: Day 1

by Ninmengi on 2015-01-09 19:30:43

Live Updates from the SWC!
We are in Atlanta covering the SWC! We will be updating this article throughout the day with the latest information and reactions with players and community members. Make sure to check back frequently and follow us on Twitter and Youtube for the latest!

Watch the event live from home:
You can catch the event live on the official stream at http://twitch.tv/SmiteGame

Watch the event on your phone:
Our friends at ZAM have created Observer for Smite a mobile app just for the SWC! Check it out for complete coverage on the go. It includes a schedule of events and even gives you push notifications when the games start! You can find it on the Apple App Store and on the Google store as well. The links are below make sure to check it out:
Google: Download Here!
Apple: Download Here!

DID vs COGR
The Quick and Dirty:
DID drafted a bruiser squad looking for an early advantage in the duo lane. COGR weathered the aggression and exerted their superior map control, getting all but one mid Harpie. DID surrendered at 15 minutes after getting wiped in their right side jungle.

Standout Player:
Divios once again put on a clinic in the solo lane. Even in a disadvantaged matchup against Apollo, Divios showed masterful control of Fenrir, often baiting out poorly timed serenades. Even after Snoopy gave up First-Blood, Divios remained calm and in control.

The Big Play:
After DID attempted to interrupt a Gold Fury, COGR turned and gave chase. A nice Cabraken ult should have cut COGR’s chase short, but TheBoosh lined it up and let his ultimate rip through two opponents, finishing off a triple kill.

It Was Over When:
At the nine-minute mark DID pulled out all the stops and made a large rotation to the solo lane to shut down a deeply-extended Divios. However, the Fenrir escaped and COGR’s own rotation to the duo lane

What’s Next:
COGR advances to the semifinal play-in match against the winner of SK and WL8. Meanwhile, DID will fight for their tournament lives against the loser of the same match.

SK vs WL8



Quick and Dirty:
played a by-the-book starvation game, shutting WL8 out of farm and experience. SK picked up nearly every Speed Buff. Several clutch Aegis plays almost saved WL8, but in the end it wasn’t enough.

Player:
As much as I want to give ManiaKK MVP honors for his excellent early-lane play, I think Zyrhoes definitely deserves the award this match. His Ao Kuang was everywhere. Even with his ultimate being blocked occassionally, no one could stop Zyrhoes from getting his kills.

Big Play:
aggressed on the WL8 duo lane. As Badgah was channeling his ultimate, Realzx dashed in and Serenaded Qe3q to keep him in range for the Ymir ultimate. Zyrhoes swoops in and finishes off both the Anhur and Sylvanus.

Was Over When:
picked up a fire giant without even a hint of contention from WL8 around the 20 minute mark. From there it was simply academic deconstruction.

Next:
advances to challenge COGR for automatic seeding into the Semifinals. WL8 will take on DID to hold on to their tournament hopes.

Titan vs OMG



Quick and Dirty:
OMG tripled down on the early game gods to attempt to end it before Titan's comp could ever come online. They displayed masterful control of the jungle, grabbing every Gold Fury in the match. Unfortunately for them, they did not push down the structures fast enough. An ill-fated teamfight shortly after the last Gold Fury brought Titan back into the game, and the boys in blue ran away with it from there.

Player:
Confrey once again worked miracles on Aphrodite. His target healing was on point and instrumental in surviving the early OMG onslaught. Repikas may have had the fancy kill line, but it was Confrey that kept the Kali alive long enough to get those kills.

Big Play:
There were SO MANY big plays this match, it's hard to pick just one. Ultimately I'll have to say the midlane fight around 22 minutes that saw OMG finally starting to push structures. Titan stood their ground and while they gave up their tier 1 tower, they won the ensuing team fight with a 3-2 kill advantage, showing that OMG's early game dominance was over.

Was Over When:
After the final Gold Fury, Repikas jumped in and started laying waste to his target. OMG's peel didn't hit its mark. Titan proceeded to smash everyone but Chaac, then rotated for a well-deserved Fire Giant. No fight was close after that.

Next:
gets a chance to go straight to the Semi-finals if they can beat the winner of COGP and Name Not Found. OMG unfortunately will have to struggle for their survival against that game's loser.

COG Prime vs. 404 Name not Found




Quick and Dirty:

Experience was King for Cog. Each player’s knowledge of their god and team proved to be dominant in this match up.

Player:
I’m going to give this to Omegatron. For the simple fact of not only getting First Blood, but continuing to own his entire side of the map, jungle and lane.

Big Play:
The Osiris first blood onto Zhong Kui set the pace for this game, hands down
Being down early is not fun and really hard to come back from.

Was Over When:
Andister cleans up three quick kills after a failed Gold Fury defense from 404. After watching each teams positioning and engagement you knew this game was over. No chance of a team fight existed after the Gold and XP lead that COG Prime sealed in that fight.

Next:
COG Prime moves forward to face off against Titan. After this dominant performance they look really hard to stop, a force to be reckoned with for sure. 404 falls to face OMG to keep their hopes alive.

DID vs WL8



Quick and Dirty:
DID drafted a high-damage composition, bringing out the famed Chinese Anubis. aBing bullied qe3q early in the duo lane with some excellent synergy between his Bakasura and IF’s Ares. WL8 survived the early game and their more traditional team composition won the day.

Player:
OReiTroll was the sole bright spot for WL8’s early game, pressuring DID’s Zhong Kui and even getting a solo kill. When he finally started rotating out of the lane he made his presence known, securing kills and setting up others.

Big Play:
Suzuki blinked from behind DID’s speed buff and found two unsuspecting opponents with his Sylvanus ultimate. WL8 followed it up with a couple kills and an easy Gold Fury.

Was Over When:
As both teams postured for Fire Giant, IF was caught out near the midcamps as Ares. With their teamfight setup gone, DID fell apart and slapped with a Deicide. WL8 ran down the midlane and finished off the Titan.

What’s Next:
Unfortunately, DID now exits the tournament in 7th/8th place. WL8’s tournament hopes are still alive, and they will play the loser of Titan and COGP.

OMG vs 404
Quick and Dirty:
Jungle Buff Invades was the name of the game for OMG today. 404 wasn’t able to get a handle on their Speed or Blue buff until very late in the game. There were several back and forth fights, where OMG would overextend into 404’s Jungle, but slowly OMG built up their lead and knocked down the Titan.

Player:
MingZhiYu had an excellent Anhur game. He freed up his team to aggress elsewhere on the map by consistently solo killing 404’s carry, Oxiledeon. Later his Desert Furies would always be on target, often hitting more than one opponent.

Big Play:
During one of OMG’s buff invades on the solo side, they stayed a little too long, baited by a low-health Chronos. They grouped up just enough for Agni bombs to deal maximum damage, and 404 picked up three kills.

Was Over When:
A fight broke out a little after 20 minutes in the duo lane. At first it looked like MingZhiYu had overextended, but it quickly became a rout with three 404 members falling. OMG rotated quickly to Fire Giant, picked it up, and killed off the two remaining 404 players.

What’s Next:
404 is out of the tournament. OMG advances to play the loser of SK and COGR.

COGR vs SK




Quick and Dirty:

An excellent show of European and North American power teams. A slow start for both teams, the first tower didn't fall until 16 minutes in. SK won several important teamfights and exerted excellent Gold Fury control. COGR put up an valiant defense despite being almost 20k behind, but in the end the lead was too much for them.

Player:
Zyrhoes put on a show with Ao Kuang. He consistently out-rotated DaGarz's Mercury, and on two occasions used his Ultimate to great effect, getting out of sticky situations while also getting a kill.

Big Play:
Snoopy tried to sneak behind SK, but missed his Earthshaker. SK turns on him, and it looks like he's about to escape but Realxz chased him down, hitting every single in hand attack to bring down the unconventional ADC. It was a beautiful execution from a top-notch hunter.

It Was Over When:
This game never really felt over, but it was certainly the beginning of the end when SK wiped 4 of COGR and picked up the fire giant at around the 20 minute mark.

What's Next:
COGR falls to the Quarterfinals match against OMG. SK advances straight to the Semifinals where they'll face the winner of the other Quarterfinals match.

COGP vs Titan



Quick and Dirty:
Titan picked their tried and true Protect the Kali composition, but COGP looked ready for it and itemized into a lot of anti-healing to shut down Repikas on the Kali. There weren't a ton of fights, but the ones that did happen were explosive. Thor dunks into Athena taunts into Scylla ults blew up Titan's backline over and over again. COGP pushed the towers early and often.

Player:
MLCSt3alth put on a highlight-reel of Scylla plays this match. Finishing with a 11 KDA, he consistently landed Crushes on the squishy Titan carries.

Big Play:
At 13 minutes a fight broke out near the left mid Harpies. JeffHindla landed an amazing double taunt which set up a stun from Andister. MLCSt3alth finished off an escaping PrettyPrime to wrap up the double kill.

Was Over When:
Confrey was forced to waste his ultimate early after getting chunked near the right mid harpies. COGP smelled blood and swooped in to kill off Ataraxia, Repikas, and Confrey. This allowed Omegatron to finish pushing down the solo lane second tier tower and the rest of his team to secure Fire Giant.

What's Next:
COGP advances straight to the semifinals where they face the winner of tomorrow's match between COGR and OMG. Titan falls to the opposite Quarterfinal where they take on WL8 to fight for their tournament lives.

Smite World Championship Instant Reaction: Titan vs OMG

by Ninmengi on 2015-01-09 19:11:49

[size=2]Quick and Dirty:[/size]
[size=2]OMG tripled down on the early game gods to attempt to end it before Titan's comp could ever come online. They displayed masterful control of the jungle, grabbing every Gold Fury in the match. Unfortunately for them, they did not push down the structures fast enough. An ill-fated teamfight shortly after the last Gold Fury brought Titan back into the game, and the boys in blue ran away with it from there.[/size]

[size=2]Player:[/size]
[size=2]Confrey once again worked miracles on Aphrodite. His target healing was on point and instrumental in surviving the early OMG onslaught. Repikas may have had the fancy kill line, but it was Confrey that kept the Kali alive long enough to get those kills.[/size]

[size=2]Big Play:[/size]
[size=2]There were SO MANY big plays this match, it's hard to pick just one. Ultimately I'll have to say the midlane fight around 22 minutes that saw OMG finally starting to push structures. Titan stood their ground and while they gave up their tier 1 tower, they won the ensuing team fight with a 3-2 kill advantage, showing that OMG's early game dominance was over. [/size]

[size=2]Was Over When:[/size]
[size=2]After the final Gold Fury, Repikas jumped in and started laying waste to his target. OMG's peel didn't hit its mark. Titan proceeded to smash everyone but Chaac, then rotated for a well-deserved Fire Giant. No fight was close after that.[/size]

[size=2]Next:[/size]
[size=2]gets a chance to go straight to the Semi-finals if they can beat the winner of COGP and Name Not Found. OMG unfortunately will have to struggle for their survival against that game's loser.[/size]

Smite World Championship Instant Reaction: SK vs WL8

by Ninmengi on 2015-01-09 18:15:34

[size=2]Quick and Dirty:[/size][size=2]
[size=2]played a by-the-book starvation game, shutting WL8 out of farm and experience. SK picked up nearly every Speed Buff. Several clutch Aegis plays almost saved WL8, but in the end it wasn’t enough.[/size][/size]
[size=2]

[size=2]Player:[/size]
[size=2]As much as I want to give ManiaKK MVP honors for his excellent early-lane play, I think Zyrhoes definitely deserves the award this match. His Ao Kuang was everywhere. Even with his ultimate being blocked occassionally, no one could stop Zyrhoes from getting his kills.[/size]

[size=2]Big Play:[/size][size=2]
[size=2]aggressed on the WL8 duo lane. As Badgah was channeling his ultimate, Realzx dashed in and Serenaded Qe3q to keep him in range for the Ymir ultimate. Zyrhoes swoops in and finishes off both the Anhur and Sylvanus.[/size][/size]
[size=2]

[size=2]Was Over When:[/size][size=2]
[size=2]picked up a fire giant without even a hint of contention from WL8 around the 20 minute mark. From there it was simply academic deconstruction.[/size][/size]
[size=2]

[size=2]Next:[/size]
[size=2]advances to challenge COGR for automatic seeding into the Semifinals. WL8 will take on DID to hold on to their tournament hopes.[/size][/size][/size][/size]

Smite World Championship Instant Reaction: DID vs COGR

by Ninmengi on 2015-01-09 17:31:28

The Quick and Dirty:
DID drafted a bruiser squad looking for an early advantage in the duo lane. COGR weathered the aggression and exerted their superior map control, getting all but one mid Harpie. DID surrendered at 15 minutes after getting wiped in their right side jungle.

Standout Player:
Divios once again put on a clinic in the solo lane. Even in a disadvantaged matchup against Apollo, Divios showed masterful control of Fenrir, often baiting out poorly timed serenades. Even after Snoopy gave up First-Blood, Divios remained calm and in control.

The Big Play:
After DID attempted to interrupt a Gold Fury, COGR turned and gave chase. A nice Cabraken ult should have cut COGR’s chase short, but TheBoosh lined it up and let his ultimate rip through two opponents, finishing off a triple kill.

It Was Over When:
At the nine-minute mark DID pulled out all the stops and made a large rotation to the solo lane to shut down a deeply-extended Divios. However, the Fenrir escaped and COGR’s own rotation to the duo lane

What’s Next:
COGR advances to the semifinal play-in match against the winner of SK and WL8. Meanwhile, DID will fight for their tournament lives against the loser of the same match.

Media room and SWC intro

by SmiteGuru on 2015-01-09 14:40:21



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Covering the SWC from Atlanta!

by SmiteGuru on 2015-01-09 01:49:24



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Removing the Winning Bias from GPM Stats

by Ninmengi on 2014-12-16 20:33:50

Why is Gold Important

Of all the skills Smite players utilize in game, the ability to generate gold efficiently may be the most important. After all, if two similar players duke it out, the one with the better items will have a clear advantage, and the only way to get those items is to buy them with gold. Not only useful for buying items, gold can also be used to gauge a player’s performance. Almost everything you can do to help your team gives bonus gold. Clear the lane? Have some gold. Knock down a tower? Have some gold. Secure the Fire Giant buff? Have even more gold. That is why this week we will be looking at how well each of the SPL players did at increasing their wealth, specifically their Gold Per Minute (GPM) statistic, during the regular season.

The Problem

There’s a major problem that comes up when you try to compare players using GPM: players on winning teams have bloated statistics. For example, Snoopy averaged 510 GPM this season while Zapman sits at only 475 GPM. You might be tempted to say that Snoopy is better at generating gold than Zapman based on these stats, but there’s one little issue with that statement: Snoopy was on a team that posted a 17-3 record, 6 more wins than Zapman’s Dignitas. Perhaps if Zapman were on a team that won as often as Cognitive Red, his GPM would be similar to Snoopy’s, maybe even better.

Generally speaking, gold leads in MOBAs are part of a positive-feedback system. The team with a gold lead can exert more pressure and clear more neutral camps, which in turn generates an even larger gold lead. This gold advantage cycle continues until there is enough of an item lead to destroy a phoenix or two and take out the Titan. Even games between closely matched teams tend to feature this sort of behaviour with gold leads. There are certainly comebacks, and occasionally teams will even win while still behind on gold, but these situations do not happen on a regular basis. It is therefore common for the winning team, and the players on that team, to have a higher GPM. This is what we call “winning bias.”

The Solution

So how do we remove winning bias? One way to do this is to see what GPM we would expect an average player to achieve with any given record, then compare this to the player of interest’s GPM. I call this value Expected GPM, and because Smite’s players tend to fall into very distinct roles I go a step further and calculate a different Expected GPM for each position. A comparison of a player’s Expected GPM and Actual GPM will give us some idea of how well the player faired. We’ve now got a ratio that we can use to compare any two players at a given position. However, most people might still want a GPM number to make comparisons. To do this, I simply multiplied the ratio of Actual GPM to Expected GPM by the average GPM for that role. Voila! A GPM stat that eliminates winning bias.

So now that I’m through with all the explanation, here are the charts that compare the GPM stats of EU SPL and NA SPL players this season:

EU SPL GPM charts

NA SPL GPM charts

A few quick clarifications. I only displayed the stats for players who played a position more than 10 games, so you won’t see Zimpstar’s stats as ADC or emilitoo as a solo laner. The stats of players with too few games are still counted toward the average GPM, Winning GPM, and Losing GPM of their role. If a player switched teams (e.g. Ninjabobat) midway through the season, only the original team is denoted though all stats from the whole season are included. I also did not count any games that were forfeited for non-gameplay reasons (e.g. the game in which Cognitive Red was disqualified for a combat pause) as the results of these games were not decided by which team knocked out the Titan first.

For this particular article, I wanted to leave the real insights up to you, the reader. However there are a few crucial points I took away from these stats. First, most players seem to be collecting gold at a similar rate. In EU, the biggest differences are in the solo lane where Psiyo and enQu lead the way with Xaliea not far behind. Mid, Jungle, and ADC players all stayed within about 2.5% of their expected GPM. I understand this for Mid and ADC, who typically find themselves clearing lanes and staying safe, but the fact that all the Junglers were also this close surprised me. The story in NA is a little different. Almost every role other than Jungle featured a 5.0% or greater spread between the top and bottom farmers. Of particular note is the consistency of Lassiz in the jungle; while he had the lowest winning GPM, he also had the highest losing GPM, meaning that Lassiz could find farm even in losing situations.

I also made a tab for full team stats. What stood out to me here is the consistency of teams getting 2050 to 2080 GPM in their losing efforts. Only Fnatic and Cognitive Red posted an average losing GPM below 2000 GPM. With the highest winning GPM and the lowest losing GPM, I feel fairly safe in saying that FNC and COGR were the most snowbally teams in the EU and NA, respectively. And just like their Jungler, Dignitas posted the lowest winning GPM but also the highest winning GPM out of either region. This means that Dignitas is one of the most consistent teams when it comes to farming.

As I continue to push toward more fair player comparison metrics, I am always finding new snags that upset the balance. If you go to the GPM vs Game Length tab, you will see that winning players have higher GPMs in short games than in long games. This is to be expected as winning the game later means gold gained from taking towers is stretched over a longer period, leading to lower GPM values. In the future, I would like to go a step further and correct for game length as well. However, there just aren’t enough games in a season to fill up the timeline and create an accurate best fit line for each position.

You’ve been reading jhuns, tune in next time for more mind-blowing stats!

17 December, 2014

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